Going in Circles

Today I am popping in to share with you another bookmark.

I made this one in an attempt to use up the last of my bonbons. But I still have a little left. Any idea what I can do with such a small amount?

Anyways, here is the pattern. 
First we want to create the circles.

Row 1. Into a magic circle, chain 3 then crochet 12 Dc stitches. Pull the magic loop tight then ss into the top of the initial chain 3.

Change Colour.

Row 2. Fasten in yarn, chain 3 then Dc twice into each of the previous rounds stitches. Ss into the top of the first chain 3.

You should create 4 circles.

Then you should attatch them to each other. I find the easiest way to do this is simply to use the tail left at the end of the circle to just tie them together before sewing in the ends.

Once you have sewn in all of the ends, put your hook into the top of the first circle, then single crochet all the way around the row of circles until you reach the first stitch once more.

For the final row, you should once again attatch the yarn to the top of the first circle, and confinue as before. However when you reach the join between the two circles (see pictures below), the stitch pattern changes. From space 1 to 7, do a hdc, then dc, htc, tc, htc, dc, and hdc. From then on you can continue to the next join in sc. 

Finally sew in the ends then block. I simply soaked the bookmark then pinned it out on a foam board and left it to dry. 

This bookmark is a little bigger than the first one, so would be great for those larger books in your collection. 

Spike Stitch Bookmark

I love to read. Being able to discuss a book with someone else is so lovely. And now I cant crochet so much on account of my carpal tunnel, I am finding more time to read.

I am currently reading a book called ‘METRO 2033’ by Dmitri Glukhovsky. Here is a brief synopsis:
“In 2013, a nuclear war occurred, forcing a large amount of Moscow’s surviving population to relocate to underground metro stations in search of refuge. Eventually, the communities settled in the underground train stations developed into independent states. Soon, factions emerged, ranging from the independent peacekeepers the “Rangers of the Order”, to the communist “Red Line” faction and the fascist “Fourth Reich”, to the more powerful factions such as “Polis”, which contained the greatest military power and the most knowledge of the past, and the “Hanza” regime, which controlled the main ring of metro stations by its sheer economic power. As these groups began to evolve, the Red Line and the Fourth Reich quickly entered a state of war, as both sought to destroy the other. As the war raged, the stations who refused to join either side were either demolished by the factions, merged into the Hanza regime, raided by criminal bandits, or formed their own independent states. Other stations were outright destroyed by animals, mutated by the nuclear fallout. While most of the stations were controlled by the 3 main factions, some stations formed an independent alliances, including the station VDNKh (“Exhibition”). Within that station, the events of Metro 2033 unfold.” (Description from wikipedia)

I am really enjoying it so far, but when I began to read it back in january, I realised I had no bookmarks! So I decided to make one – this is what I will be sharing with you today!

Here is the pattern:
Chain 11. Turn.

Row 1. Sc into second chain from hook then the next 9 for 10 Sc in total. Turn.

Row 2. Chain 1. Sc into next 10 stitches along previous row. Turn.

Row 3 to 5. Repeat 3 more time for 5 rows of 10 Sc.

Change Colour.

Row 6. For the first row of every new colour, the sequence is as follows: Sc into first 2 stitches of last row you crocheted (row 5), then into the 3rd stitch of the row below (row 4), then the fourth stitch of the row below that (row 3) then the 5th stitch of the row below that (row 2). Then we simply take those instructions in reverse for the remaining 5 stitches of the row.
It is then as simple as completing 4 more rows of Sc before changing colour once more.
Now all you need to do is repeat row 6-10 repeatedly until the bookmark is your desired length! 

Easy peasy! 

You many need to block it out. I just soaked it, pinned it out then left it to dry. 

What are you reading at the mo? What is your favourite genre? Your favourite author! Or reccomendations for seriously good sci-fi novels? Let me know in the comments!

Pretty Chain Scarf

​I had just made the poncho, which I finally shared with you the other day, and I got a bit obsessed with tshirt yarn. It works up so nicely! So I popped onto ebay and found some lovely patterned tshirt yarn. This is what I made with it!

And here is the pattern.

Row 1. In the 2nd and 3rd chain from hook, sc. *Then Ch 19, skip 19 chains in the previous row and Sc into the 20th*. Repeat 7 more times for 8 sets of  Ch 19. Sc one more time into the final chain of the foundation chain. Chain 1, then turn.
Row 2. Sc into the 2nd and 3rd Sc of the previous row. *Then Ch 19, skip 19 chains in the previous row and Sc into the next Sc of the previous row*. Repeat 7 more times for 8 sets of  Ch 19. Sc one more time into the final stitch of the last row. Chain 1, then turn.

To continue. Repeat row 2 until the scarf reaches your desired width, then fasten off and weave in ends. 

Many Pretty Stitches

Its super difficult not being able to crochet much due to my hands. 

So instead I have been spending stupid amounts of time on pinterest putting together a stitch library on pinterest! 

Here is a collage of some of my favourite stitches. 

You can find the board here
Have any suggestions for stitches I have missed? Leave me a link in the comments!

Happy hooking.

Ponchoooooooo!

Yahooooo! I finally found time to write up my pattern for my poncho! Success!

I made this poncho months ago, but have really struggled to find time to write it up. 
I really love the colours – it was the colours that really inspired me – is saw them sat together in a Tiger store, and just had to make something with them. 

Then began the long process of actually making it and getting enough yarn. I used up my first 6 balls and realised I would need a hell of a lot more. But as anyone who has ever bought yarn in a tiger store will know, they only have a small amount at a time. And its not always the same. So I went to my local store. They didnt have any anymore. I had to go up to oxford street where there are 2 stores. The first store didnt have enough. So I emptied them out and made my way to the second store. I emptied them out too! Finally I had enough. It was a palava!

Anyways, I hope all my effort was worth it! Here is the pattern!

Begin to create a standard square of c2c crochet for 27 rows.
To do this follow these instructions:

1.Chain 6. Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain from the hook.  Chain 6. Turn.

2. Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain from the hook. Ss into the space between the chain and first Dc of the previous row. Chain 3. Then Dc 3 times into the same space. Chain 6. Turn.

3. Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain from the hook. Ss into the space between the chain and first Dc of the previous row. Chain 3. Then Dc 3 times into the same space. Ss into the next. space between the chain and first Dc of the previous row. Chain 3. Then Dc 3 times into the same space. Chain 6. Turn.

Row 4-27. From here on, just continue to increase (Chain 6 then Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain – like you have been doing at the beginning of every row) until you have reached 27 rows. You can change colours as often as you like.
Once you have reached 27 rows, you should have 27 blocks along the top row along which you have been stitching.

Now we will create the shoulder/neck hole area. This has to be worked in two parts so I will make the a (Left) and b (Right). Bear in mind that I am writing this as a left hander, so if you are a right hander, it will be the other way round, so a (Right) and b (Left). Really, the easiest way to explain this is to say that a is the side on which row 27 ended.

Row 28a. Continue as the previous round with an increase and continue the standard row until you have 11 blocks.

Row 29a. This is where you will perform your first decrease.

*To decrease, instead of continuing, you slip stitch into the next chain 3 as normal but instead of chaining 3 to start the next block, you turn your work and Ss along the top of your precious block until you reach the chain 3, then continue the row as you normall would by chaining 3 and Dc 3 times into the chain 3 space.*

As stated continue onto the next block, and keep going to the end. This row should also have 11 blocks.

Row 30a. Increase at the beginning them continue to the end. Stop after 11 blocks.

Row 31a. Increase at the beginning then continue to the end for 11 blocks.

Row 32a. Decrease at the beginning then continue to the end for 11 blocks. Fasten off.

From the other side, (the side on which you started row 27) count in 11 blocks. Fasten your yarn into the chain 3 space to begin the first block of row 28b.

28b. Chain 3, then Dc 3 times into the chain 3 space of the previous round. Continue the round as normal for 11 blocks.

29b. Increase at the beginning them continue to the end. Stop after 11 blocks.

30b. Decrease at the beginning then continue to the end for 11 blocks.

Row 31b. Increase at the beginning then continue to the end for 11 blocks.

Row 32b. Decrease at the beginning then continue to the end for 11 blocks. Fasten off.

When you lay your work out flat, you should now see that the square is starting to decrease. The next row is the most fiddly bit. You should start on side b. 
Row 33. Fasten the yarn into the last block of the last round. Chain 3 then Dc 3 times into the same chain 3 space. Continue to create blocks until you have reached the end of row 32b. You should have 11 blocks. You will now need to create a block as you would at the beginning of an increase row, by chaining 6 then Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain. The difference here is thay intead of turning and slip stitching into a chain 3 space, you should instead chain 6 and repeat the process again. In total you will need to do this 6 times. Only then, will you slip stith into the next chain 3 space. And continue the row as normal until the end. Before you do this however, make sure your 6 previous blocks are lined up. You will have to twist them a little so that all of the chain 3 spaces sit correctly. This is something that I cant really explain, you will just have to have a play about. You will also notice that the 6th square doesnt look quite right when you ss into the chain three space – you just need to correct this by attatching the bottom of the final Dc in block 6 to the top of the final Dc in the block you have just ss into. Job done.

We are now in the home stretch!

Row 34. From this point on we just decrease as we would a standard square, by decreasing at the end of each row, by stopping 1 short of the end and ss. Across the top of the previous block into the chain 3 then beginning the next row from there. The rows will now start to shrink! Hurrah!

Row 35-60. Decrease with each row until you reach just one single block in row 60. You will ne surptised how quickly this goes!

Fasten off, weave in ends, and marvel in your handy work!

Mistletoe Mittens 

I know its a little late for mistletoe, but the truth is I am really rubbish at finding the time to write up patterns! 

I made these mittens with a lovely ball of Sirdar Giselle in a colourway called mistletoe. I fell in love with it as I absolutely loved the combo of green and copper. Unfortunately it wasnt as lovely all the way through. The green gets rather muddy at times. 

Anyways, these mittens are very easy. They are done corner to corner. Essentially, you are just creating a square. And they are a perfect stash buster! You can find a link below to a video I found really helpful when learning c2c.

I used a 4.5mm hook and dk yarn, but since you are just creating a rectangle you can use whatever size hook and weight of yarn you fancy! 

To make them, follow these instructions.

1. Chain 6. Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain from the hook.  Chain 6. Turn. 

2. Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain from the hook. Ss into the space between the chain and first Dc of the previous row. Chain 3. Then Dc 3 times into the same space. Chain 6. Turn. 

3. Dc into the 4th 5th and 6th chain from the hook. Ss into the space between the chain and first Dc of the previous row. Chain 3. Then Dc 3 times into the same space. Ss into the next. space between the chain and first Dc of the previous row. Chain 3. Then Dc 3 times into the same space. Chain 6. Turn.

The process at the beginning of the row, wherein you create a new block or tile by chaining 6 the Dc into the 3 furthest chains from the hook is called an increase.

From this point onwards, it is very simple. You just continue working rows as above, increasing at the beginning of every row, until one edge of your triangle measures up to be roughly the distance from the nuckle on your little finger to an inch below your wrist. Of course, you could make it longer if you wanted to have something more like arm warmers. Once the desired length is reached you will need to begin the decrease. 

To begin to create the rectangle or square shape, all you need to do is stop one block short of the complete row, and instead of Ss then Ch 3, you should Ss, then turn your work, then Ss back up the 3 Dc from the previous round. This is called a decrease. 

To create a square, you would decrease at the beginning of each row. To create a rectangle, you would decrease at the beginning of one row, then increase at the beginning of the next until it has reached the width you desire, at chich point you would decrease at the beginning of both rows. 

My mittens were 8 blocks by 11 blocks, but yours may vary.

Once you have created your square, just fasten off. Then, fold the rectangle in half. Lay your hand on top to gauge where you would like the thumb hole to be. Then place a stitch marker just below and just above where your thumb will be.

Take the ends (you should have one at the top amd one at the bottom) and use them to sew up the side of the folded rectangle until you hit the stitch markers. (So one end would sew up the sides up to the marker placed below your thumb and the other end will would sew up the sides down to the marker placed above your thumb) If you have done it right, you should now have a complete mitten with a hole to poke your thumb out of! 

Yaaaaay! Now you just have to make another in exactly the same way!

What do you think? I love the end result even if I wasnt so pleased with the varigation of the yarn. Have any of you found that the initial impression of a varigated yarn doesnt live up to expectations once you have worked it up? Please share in the comments! I would love to know so I avoid this dissapointment in the end! 

Finally Finished…

Look! I finally finished making this dino scoodie! Yahooooo! 

I have been working on this for a very long time. Like, since august 2015… but I finally finished it!

I followed this pattern.

I made a few modifications, namely I just used the claw pattern to create the spikes along the top.

What do you think! I am hoping the recipient likes it! It should be arriving with him any day now!